Tag Archives: illustration

18.36.54 House by Daniel Libeskind — Revisited (Again)

If an apology is due for repetition, then so be it…I apologize. But, I cannot get enough of “18.36.54 House” by Daniel Libeskind — Modern Work Of Art Set In Nature. This design successfully challenges all our traditional notions of shape, angularity, and perspective while offering a fully functional residence in a complimentary juxtaposition of manufactured forms and materials against organic form and nature. So, herewith is a third visit to Mr. Libeskind’s residential work of art, with additional images and documentation.

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As I said previously, “Challenging both traditional and modern concepts of ‘the house in the landscape,’ this design gives nothing of itself up to its natural setting, but selectively incorporates the elements thereof for the enhancement of both house and landscape.”

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“Crayons” Mural: A Sandy Hook School Shooting Mural

Crayons Cropped

“Crayons” — a 6′ × 24′ graffiti mural by Gamma Acosta, Longmont, Colorado — has attracted “viral” internet attention as an artist’s statement about the Sandy Hook school massacre.

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Gamma Acosta - Sandy Hook

The murals that artist Gamma Acosta paints on his uncle’s vacant building are usually temporary. At some point, a fresh coat of paint turns the wall back into a blank canvas. This time, after the mural went up — one day following the Connecticut shooting — an anonymous art collector contacted Acosta about preserving the piece. In the five and a half years that Acosta has painted murals on his uncle’s building, this is the first time he’s cut out a piece, rather than painting over it.

Acosta & "Crayons"

“Crayons” is powerful… a kick in the gut… heart-wrenching… a single image capturing the horror of that day… an unforgettable expression about something we must never forget.

Reaction to the piece has been mixed. Internet discussions indicate that a great many people feel it’s shocking, vile, repulsive, inappropriate and too soon. Perhaps this is true, but that’s the point… to make sure we never forget.

The mural is a reaction to Sandy Hook, not a memorial to the victims. Inciting one to thought is its purpose, and on this it succeeds magnificently.

“The intent was to get people to think about it, and not from a political standpoint, gun control or anything like that… We can’t become complacent about this stuff or it’s not gonna stop,” the artist offered.

Crayons - Sandy Hook Mural